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Preparations Underway to Make Nepal a Free WiFi Country

Nepal could soon be a free WiFi nation

In what could be a major boost to the rate of technological progress in Nepal, a special panel formed by the government of Nepal is planning to make the whole country into a free WiFi zone. The Ministry of Information and Communication put forward this ambitious plan on January 3rd, 2013.

A bold plan

The fact is that only a few rich and developed nations of the world have managed to give free WiFi internet access to its citizens. In 2003, the tiny Pacific Island nation of Nieu declared itself to be the first free WiFi nation. Lately nations like Thailand and Greece have started efforts to follow suit. Yet, as one of the least developed nations in the world, the declaration of the free WiFi plan by the Nepal government has attracted attention from technology and development experts throughout the world

The connectivity situation

Although steadily growing, the internet penetration rate of Nepal isn’t so high when compared to developed countries. Many citizens aren’t able to afford internet connections due to their high charges. Although WiFi enabled mobile phones and tablets are sold throughout the country, people haven’t been able to afford the internet charges. Expensive mobile internet charges have discouraged many people from getting much out of their devices. But if the government plan works, then millions of people of the country would be freely connected to the world.

Benefiting the common people

Nepal is a country where more than half of the population are farmers. So internet connectivity to farmers could mean access to markets and new trends in farming. Access to quality education through the internet could also mean a better standard of education for schoolchildren across the country. Medicinal facilities through e-medical services could also help save thousands of lives. Hence, the benefits of free WiFi are immense.

Ambitious but achievable

Although free WiFi to all its citizens may look like a bit too ambitious for Nepal, it is definitely worth a try. The benefits could easily outweigh the cost. However the planners need to ensure that such a plan isn’t just a plan on paper. Bold plans need bold actions.

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