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Showing posts from August, 2013

Eating fruit significantly cuts diabetes risk - but drinking juice INCREASES it,

The scientists found that blueberries, grapes, raisins, apples and pears were especially protective, while drinking fruit juice could increase the risk of developing the condition by as much as 8 percent. source

Eating fruit significantly cuts diabetes risk - but drinking juice INCREASES it,

The scientists found that blueberries, grapes, raisins, apples and pears were especially protective, while drinking fruit juice could increase the risk of developing the condition by as much as 8 percent. source

Broccoli slows arthritis, researchers think

Our body takes this glucoraphanin compound and turns it into another, called sulforaphane, which appears to protect the joints. source

Broccoli slows arthritis, researchers think

Our body takes this glucoraphanin compound and turns it into another, called sulforaphane, which appears to protect the joints. source

Miniature human brain grown in lab

The cells were able to grow and organise themselves into separate regions of the brain, such as the cerebral cortex, the retina, and, rarely, an early hippocampus, which would be heavily involved in memory in a fully developed adult brain. source

Miniature human brain grown in lab

The cells were able to grow and organise themselves into separate regions of the brain, such as the cerebral cortex, the retina, and, rarely, an early hippocampus, which would be heavily involved in memory in a fully developed adult brain. source

University of St Andrews scientists create fastest man-made spinning object

They saw it spin faster and faster until it reached 600 million rpm – and then it seemed to vanish! source

University of St Andrews scientists create fastest man-made spinning object

They saw it spin faster and faster until it reached 600 million rpm - and then it seemed to vanish! source

India parliament debates cheap food plan

The scheme aims to give 5kg 11lb of cheap grain every month to about 800 million poor people. source

India parliament debates cheap food plan

The scheme aims to give 5kg 11lb of cheap grain every month to about 800 million poor people. source

Ovarian cancer screening has potential

There is a survival rate of up to 90% when ovarian cancer is caught early, compared with less than 30% if it is discovered in the later stages. source

Ovarian cancer screening has potential

There is a survival rate of up to 90% when ovarian cancer is caught early, compared with less than 30% if it is discovered in the later stages. source

Facebooks Internet.org aims to get billions online

Mr Zuckerberg said the goal was to make internet access available to those who cannot currently afford it. source   internet.org

Facebooks Internet.org aims to get billions online

Mr Zuckerberg said the goal was to make internet access available to those who cannot currently afford it. source   internet.org

Scientists accidentally make ‘impossible material’ Upsalite - the world’s most efficient water absorber

The breakthrough has far-reaching commercial applications, as Upsalite named after the University of Uppsala, where the scientists are based is the worlds most efficient water absorber, with potential to be used for the removal of moisture in drug creation and high-tech electronics to cleaning up huge oil spills. source   It doesn’t look like much, but scientists from Sweden’s Uppsala University are calling a newly created form of magnesium carbonate an “impossible” material. Dubbed upsalite, the highly porous material sets new records for surface area and water absorption, according to a written statement issued by the university. It is expected to have all sorts of applications, from controlling moisture in processes used by the electronics and pharmaceutical industries to sopping up toxins in the aftermath of chemical and oil spills. “In contrast to what has been claimed for more than 100 years in the scientific literature, we have found that amorphous magnesium carbonate can be mad

Scientists accidentally make ‘impossible material’ Upsalite - the world’s most efficient water absorber

The breakthrough has far-reaching commercial applications, as Upsalite named after the University of Uppsala, where the scientists are based is the worlds most efficient water absorber, with potential to be used for the removal of moisture in drug creation and high-tech electronics to cleaning up huge oil spills. source   It doesn't look like much, but scientists from Sweden's Uppsala University are calling a newly created form of magnesium carbonate an "impossible" material. Dubbed upsalite, the highly porous material sets new records for surface area and water absorption, according to a written statement issued by the university. It is expected to have all sorts of applications, from controlling moisture in processes used by the electronics and pharmaceutical industries to sopping up toxins in the aftermath of chemical and oil spills. "In contrast to what has been claimed for more than 100 years in the scientific literature, we have found that amorphous magnesi

Breast cancer drugs could treat lung cancer

Experimental drugs already used to treat breast cancer may also fight lung cancer, research reveals. source

Breast cancer drugs could treat lung cancer

Experimental drugs already used to treat breast cancer may also fight lung cancer, research reveals. source

How to grow a burger in the lab

Here, Prof Mark Post of Maastricht University who led the research, explains how the burger was made and reveals the freezers full of ingredients. source   A group of scientists from the Netherlands will introduce the world’s first in-vitro burger made in a laboratory.The process involves taking the stem cells from cows and growing them in petri dishes until they have formed thousands of muscle fibres.Supporters of the laboratory burgers and animal activists say that it will reduce the need for factory farming.Al Jazeera’s Nadim Baba reports from London.

How to grow a burger in the lab

Here, Prof Mark Post of Maastricht University who led the research, explains how the burger was made and reveals the freezers full of ingredients. source   A group of scientists from the Netherlands will introduce the world's first in-vitro burger made in a laboratory.The process involves taking the stem cells from cows and growing them in petri dishes until they have formed thousands of muscle fibres.Supporters of the laboratory burgers and animal activists say that it will reduce the need for factory farming.Al Jazeera's Nadim Baba reports from London.