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Google's new offering: Contact lens for diabetic patients

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="620"] The Google Contact Lens[/caption]

Diabetic patients of today need to bear the trouble of pricking their fingertips whenever they have to get readings of their blood sugar level. However, with the announcement of the Google Contact Lens on January 16, 2014, pricking yourself could be a thing of the past soon. Equipped with antenna and sensors the Google Contact Lens can regularly feed data to a device that shows the readings. It's estimated that more than 35 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide. So the technology could indeed benefit millions of people.

Google also announced that it had already performed successful trials with patients and now was looking for partners in the medical industry to roll out the product in markets. Furthermore, the company also informed that it was looking at ways to make modifications to the product so as to warn patients about dangerous levels of blood sugar.

The cases of diabetes are growing more and more globally as dietary patterns are changing. A lot of diabetes patients don't even realize that they are suffering from the disease, until the effects are severe. Troublesome screening techniques dissuade many from taking tests to determine whether they are diabetic or not. But Google's new offering could definitely ensure that the diagnosis is much less troublesome and early.

With dietary habits changing throughout the world, the number of diabetic patients is constantly increasing. While cases of Type II diabetes, that is transmitted hereditarily, is more or less common throughout the world, the number of patients with Type I diabetes is growing at alarming rates. Most diabetic patients heavily change and their dietary pattern after diagnosis, often due to the fear of severe consequences. But through the constant data feed of glucose level, patients may not need to feel guilty and fearful after eating a bar of chocolate.

The announcement by Google has been welcomed by a lot of people within the health industry.

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